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  1. Sayeed
  2. MOXF
  3. Friday, 30 December 2016
Hi all,

I have been searching detail video or article written about MOXF's DAW integration with Apple Logic Pro X for a long time, but couldn't find definite answer for few questions. I have heard that MOXF's DAW controlling options become very limited if Cubase AI or full version is not used, but to what extent? Is it true that only 4 out of 8 endless encoders are available for 3rd party DAWs such as Logic? Is Logic ASIO or VSTi / VST3 compatible? Can I use/assign all the track buttons, sustain paddles, pitch bends, volume slider etc.?

I found Logic a much cheaper option than the full version of Cubase considering the features I need. But at the same time, I wanted to use a keyboard controller trippled as a DAW controller, USB audio interface and tone generator. MOXF could have been my best choice but this limitation is a deal breaker for sure. I am now considering an AKAI MPK249 midi controller, Behringer QX1002 USB audio interface and Halion Sonic 2 as an alternative (Does Halion Sonic 2 offer Motif sounds?)

If anyone ever used the MOXF and Logic Pro X combination, can you please share the experience or provide any link? What am I going to lose in terms of control if I use MOXF as opposed to a normal midi keyboard controller like AKAI MPK249 that has 8 endless encoders? Thanks.
Responses (4)
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
The difference between using a Steinberg DAW and using Logic has to do with how data is saved and what gets setup automatically. The MOXF's Logic Pro Template is designed to work specifically with Logic Pro. You can review the parameters setup in the MOXF documentation.

The "Yamaha MOXF6/MOXF8 Editor Standalone/VST" can run as a VST inside of Steinberg or any VST3 compatible DAW; this means when you save the DAW file your MOXF setup is automatically saved and bundled in the DAW file.
Logic Pro is not VST3 compatible so you would run the Editor as a Standalone application... meaning that you will have to save your MOXF setup separately. That's the main difference.

Don't however, buy the MOXF as a soft synth controller, that is just one of things it does. Buy it because the MOXF is the entire Motif XF sound set (all 3,977 Waveforms) with Flash Board expansion (additional 2,048 Waveforms of your own choosing), 128 Note polyphony, cutting edge Effects, A/D Input, built-in 4-in/2-out audio interface for your computer, built-in MIDI interface, dual stereo record via USB, and is one of the best selling music production workstations of this century.

I don't think the Akai can make any of those claims. It's a controller, if that's what you need that's where it's $$ went.
The MOXF, in an ultimate apples and oranges comparison, is a completely different animal. Completely. Get one when you're ready for a powerhouse hardware synth with arguably one of the best sound set out there. Only when you're ready!
  1. more than a month ago
  2. MOXF
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Thank you very much Bad Mister for the clarification. I read your posts in Motifator and here in Yamaha Synth regularly. It's an honor to have an advice from an expert like you. There's no doubt MOXF is the best workstation in that price range. If you read my post closely, you'd notice that I didn't make any apple to orange comparison as I mentioned at least 3 devices (AKAI MPK249 keyboard controller + Behringer QX1002 USB audio mixer + Halion Sonic 2) plus Logic Pro X (alternative to hardware sequencer/ Cubase AI) to replace the MOXF, although that's not enough because we have to keep MOXF's solid ability to play live and hardware synth performance in mind. Not to mention the seamless integration with Cubase.

But as a hobbyist and occasional live performer, my dilemma is two dimensional -- Budget and Ergonomics. I want minimum number of cable connections in my rig with minimum price. I don't want a separate device for USB Audio Interface, DAW transport and track controller beside my master keyboard controller. MOXF would give me exactly that, but on the software side, I need to pay $700+ for the full version of Cubase just to use feature like variaudio stretching and #500+ more for the full sampling capability of Halion. Cubase AI is enough for sequencing but not for those Melodyne style editing and sampling requirement that I must have.

On the other hand, with a $220 Logic Pro X + $30 Mainstage, I can have both the full sampler (EXS24) and the Flex Pitch feature, plus tons of medium quality sounds. I still wouldn't mind to add a $1400 MOXF as opposed to $479 AKAI to the Logic setup despite the VST3 incompatibility. But getting only 4 knobs instead of the full 8 to control all soft synths still makes me miss Akai's 4 banks of 32 knobs. And despite being a Yamaha fan all my life, the possibility that this limitation is indeed a business decision to promote Cubase, rather than a technical one, left me with a bitter feelings.

Any mid priced Midi Keyboard controller can assign all of its button to any DAW now a days. Even I can use Akai's latest Advanced midi controller's all 8 encoders without installing the VIP software which is otherwise required to use all 4 banks. So It is not understandable to me why MOXF disabled half of its physical encoders (And many other buttons) for non-native DAWs (If this is true). It should at least offer 1 full bank. I can't imagine using a second DAW Controller like Behringer X-touch mini alongside MOXF to fill this silly gap. It would cause a significant inconvenience to my workflow considering the price point.

I think Yamaha should either drop price for Cubase, Halion or open up MOXF for all vendors equally. Making everything proprietary would only cost them potential customer like me who values the workflow.

However, can the MOXF manual be able to provide a detail picture about which buttons are available for assignment if I use Logic pro X? That would help my buying decision a lot. Thanks a lot again!
  1. more than a month ago
  2. MOXF
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Hi, I know it is some time since this was asked but for those asking, I have to say I am having a good deal of difficulty. Out of the box you will get transport control from the MOXF and that's pretty much it.

There is no other default button mapping. Yamaha, being the owner of Steinburg have done all they can to put an advantage on Cubase by disabling their competitors. They seem to show little in the way of interest in providing decent integration with other DAWs. It does indeed work at a fundamental level but you should buy this keyboard not as a DAW controller but as a superb synth which it most certainly is.

If you're looking for more ready integration out of logic, you'd be better off with another solution. I actually got so frustrated that I purchased a Nektar Impact LX49+ as a supplementary midi contoller that offers me access to the Yamaha while also providing far superior integration with Logic, as well as pads.

The combination seems to provide me with the best of both worlds!
  1. one week ago
  2. MOXF
  3. # 3
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation

Hi, I know it is some time since this was asked but for those asking, I have to say I am having a good deal of difficulty. Out of the box you will get transport control from the MOXF and that's pretty much it.

There is no other default button mapping. Yamaha, being the owner of Steinburg have done all they can to put an advantage on Cubase by disabling their competitors. They seem to show little in the way of interest in providing decent integration with other DAWs.
Well, that’s not at all true. Perhaps, just perhaps, you might have missed something.
  1. one week ago
  2. MOXF
  3. # 4
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