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  2. Sherlock Holmes The Voice
  3. CP Series Stage Pianos
  4. Tuesday, 02 April 2019
Does anyone know how CP88 features and voices stand against KAWAI MP7SE and 11SE?

Cheers.
Responses (3)
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
What are your opinion and feelings about the Kawai MP7SE keybed? As I understand it does not have the heavy wooden based keybed as the MP11SE. Instead some kind of tri-sensored plastic based fully weighted keybed. What do you think? I need a stage piano for many purposes, not only classical piano. Do you think the MP7SE have a more versatile and not quite heavy feeling keybed that is more playable in different situations? This thanks to it's "cheaper" and lighter keybed construction? And how does it compare with the CP88 action? One important aspect here is also the price level of the Kawai. :)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. CP Series Stage Pianos
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Kawai MP11SE is a lot like the CP in approach. It similarly has three sections: Piano, EP, and Sub for everything else, with a relatively small number of sounds in each section with pretty direct selection, and with each section having its own volume control and key range selector; and with banks of 8 buttons for calling up your custom combinations; and with four zones of external MIDI control. The CP has an array of dedicated effects knobs, whereas Kawai has four programmable knobs. Kawai adds song recorder, audio recorder, rhythms. It includes their top of line piano sound and action, though sound and action are always subjective. Kawai weighs over 70 lbs, so you may have to factor in the cost of a roadie.

MP7E is a lot more flexible and has a lot more sounds, but has a more traditional keyboard approach, i.e. more menus, less direct access. A couple of features that I think are particularly noteworthy is that it includes a clonewheel organ engine, and it has a four slider setup which improves its usability as a four zone MIDI controller.


Thanks Scott. I'm not sure what to say as I haven't had a chance to try MP11SE but MP11SE has keys just like Grand piano (that's why it is 70lbs) and I don't know of any Yamaha keyboard at this price range that has similar key action. That being said, CP88 sounds really sweet.

I tried MP7SE yesterday and man it was exquisite! Unfortunately, CP88 wasn't available but I tried CP4, RD2000 and an acoustic Kawai Grand Piano in the store. MP7SE stole my heart away! What an amazing instrument! I unconsciously played it for an hour not remembering what I played!

If anyone has more to add to this discussion please don't hesitate to inform me. I really appreciate it.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. CP Series Stage Pianos
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Kawai MP11SE is a lot like the CP in approach. It similarly has three sections: Piano, EP, and Sub for everything else, with a relatively small number of sounds in each section with pretty direct selection, and with each section having its own volume control and key range selector; and with banks of 8 buttons for calling up your custom combinations; and with four zones of external MIDI control. The CP has an array of dedicated effects knobs, whereas Kawai has four programmable knobs. Kawai adds song recorder, audio recorder, rhythms. It includes their top of line piano sound and action, though sound and action are always subjective. Kawai weighs over 70 lbs, so you may have to factor in the cost of a roadie.

MP7E is a lot more flexible and has a lot more sounds, but has a more traditional keyboard approach, i.e. more menus, less direct access. A couple of features that I think are particularly noteworthy is that it includes a clonewheel organ engine, and it has a four slider setup which improves its usability as a four zone MIDI controller.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. CP Series Stage Pianos
  3. # 3
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