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  1. dave
  2. Sherlock Holmes The Voice
  3. MODX Series Synthesizers
  4. Wednesday, 24 February 2021
Hi There,

This is one where I think I can guess the answer, but just wondering if anyone can confirm for me...

I am playing a gig where I do left hand bass and right hand often assigned to an organ part.

I want to fade the organ in nice and slowly at times so I have assigned the volume to the superknob so that my foot controller then works as a volume control for the organ part.

I am not using a Yamaha foot controller/ expression pedal and with the budget pedal I have the fade in or fade outs aren't perfectly smooth - you can see the light on the superknob wobble as you advance around clockwise -, i.e. it's not a smooth light light going round, but will advance with little jumps backwards and forwards on the dial as you go round.

Previously I was doing the fade in just with the slider ( by hand) and it was much more controllable and smooth.

I have tried different curves, which doesn't seem to help so I am hoping if I buy the Yamaha expression pedal I will be able to get a beautifully smooth transition without any "jumpiness"?

Can anyone back up or has experience with the quality of this piece of hardware?

P.S. I am still getting to understand the relationship between superknob/ assignable knobs and superknob which seems to by default be connected to the foot controller 2.

I did see some videos / tutorials on this a while ago but having a bit of trouble finding them now. I believe there was one regarding the set upof the CFX + FM EP performance and the fade in/out controlled by the superknob/foot controller?

thanks!
Responses (3)
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I am not using a Yamaha foot controller/ expression pedal and with the budget pedal I have the fade in or fade outs aren't perfectly smooth - you can see the light on the superknob wobble as you advance around clockwise -, i.e. it's not a smooth light light going round, but will advance with little jumps backwards and forwards on the dial as you go round.


Sounds like a dirty pot.

FC7s seem smooth enough. If one has been in a flood - it might jump around on you though. Buying new (from reputable sources) side-steps this kind of issue.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. MODX Series Synthesizers
  3. # 1
Bad Mister
Yamaha
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I have tried different curves, which doesn't seem to help so I am hoping if I buy the Yamaha expression pedal I will be able to get a beautifully smooth transition without any "jumpiness"?
Yes, and it is highly recommended.

Can anyone back up or has experience with the quality of this piece of hardware?
I have the same FC7 pedal for more than twenty years and it has several hundred thousand miles on it. Truly, I typically would travel with pedals ...and in my gig, like the song says, “I’ve been everywhere, man...” For me, if I travel a thousand miles to do a product demonstration I cannot count on the store having the pedals, so they were apart of my travel kit for many years...

Your mileage may vary, I treat my pedals like they’re apart of my instrument. If you throw it in a bag, with the cables and tools, you may have a less lengthy, less problem free experience. But the FC7 is built like a brick. It is adjustable. And more than anything it is designed to work with your instrument.

P.S. I am still getting to understand the relationship between superknob/ assignable knobs and superknob which seems to by default be connected to the foot controller 2.
Here’s a quick overview:
There is Knob Function Control section in the upper left corner of the front panel.

There is a button that toggles the Knob functions... 4 rows of 4 functions.
When you *select* a Part, each Part has these 16 (Quick Edit) Knobs.
When the [ASSIGN] button is lit, the Knob become Assign Knobs. Each Part has 8 Assign Knobs.

That’s 24 Knobs per Part. You can see how they are accessed using the buttons to activate the function, and the screen to show you what is selected.

On the MODX you navigate 1-4, 5-8, 9-12, and 13-16 using buttons.
See this article for details: Mastering MODX: Navigation Tips
The screen will indicate which row and which Part is selected and is the owner of the Knobs.
You may see a Part number or Common. Common means the Knob Function will apply to all Parts in “common”.

Just like each of the 16 Parts has 16 Quick Edit and 8 Assign Knobs, the “Common” has 16 Quick Edit and 8 Assign Knobs.

Okay, let’s back up a bit... there are tons of parameters in each Part. Each Part is a complete synthesizer with its own complete set of functions, effects and parameter settings. You can, depending on how you are using a Part, pick eight assignable parameters from each Part and design how they respond to the Assign Knob.

Now rather than have a front panel with scores and scores of Knobs, the MONTAGE/MODX have introduced a way that you can determine exactly how much change occurs to each assigned parameter. And because manipulating the front panel can be done (certainly) these synths are music synthesizers, meant to be played via the keyboard.

How can you simultaneously control multiple synth Parts and with a single gesture change the mix... I don’t mean just turning everyone up or down together... I mean change the mix, turn the drums up, turn the guitar part down, turn the horns completely off, and fade in strings all with a single control gesture.

This is done by individually assigning a Knob to change the output level of the Part and program its Control Set to change it the exact amount and direction (up/down) you want it to change. Do this for each Part with one of its Assign Knobs.

Next you can “link” the Part’s Assign Knob with a Common Assign Knob (remember “Common” can address all). The 8 Common Assign Knobs are, by default, linked to movement of the Super Knob. So you can keep both hands on the keyboard, while you remix your backing...

That’s just one small example. The Control Matrix of the instrument is huge.
Each Part can have 16 Control Sets — a Control Set consists of a “Source” Controller, a “Destination” Parameter, a “Curve” Type, a “Polarity direction, a “Ratio” amount of change, and one or two Shaper parameters “Param 1/Param2” depending on the current Curve Type.

The Performance Common has 16 Control Sets as well. It is in this fashion the Super Knob can reach into any of the 16 Parts, or into all 16 of the Parts and make specific detailed changes.

At first it seems overwhelming... but like any art, it is constructed. Looking at a ‘finished’ modular synthesizer with all the patch cables will look overwhelming on the initial sighting... but once you realize it was assembled one assignment at a time, it ceases being so overwhelming.

You are creating parameter changes... and they can be grouped through the Assign Knob / Super Knob system. Each of the Common Assign Knobs can be controlling multiple Parts, you can create groupings, you can link them to the Super Knob or adjust them directly.

At first you link everything to the Super Knob, after that wears off, you start making better decisions and link those things that dramatically improve your performing. You have a bunch of functions that can be assigned to other controllers.

The Super Knob defaults to Foot Controller 2 — but even that is programmable on a per Performance basis.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. MODX Series Synthesizers
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Thanks BM! and Jason.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. MODX Series Synthesizers
  3. # 3
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