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  1. M.
  2. S70/90XS
  3. Saturday, 14 January 2017
With a song I have to prepare, I want to use one sound for the verse, and another, different one, for the chorus.

To do this with the synth (I'm still a beginner with it), I create a PERFORMANCE where the first VOICE (say a violin sound) is set as PART 1, then the second VOICE (i.e. an organ sound) is set as PART 2.

When I start playing (I'm at the verse) PART 1 is ON; when the verse ends and the chorus is about to start, I turn on PART 2 and turn off PART 1 with the PART ON/OFF buttons in the top left of the synth.

But during this "shift", I'm still holding down the keys, so I'm still producing the sound with the VOICE in PART 1. When I operate as explained above, turning off PART 1 cuts the sound still being played, producing an unpleasant effect.

Is there a way to avoid that? Perhaps should I handle these requirements with a different approach?
Basically, I want the sound of PART 1 not to be instantly silenced while I'm still keeping any key pressed.
Responses (3)
Bad Mister
Yamaha
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
The keyboard is only doing what you are instructing it to do - you say your turning OFF the PART with a PART ON/OFF button, well actually those are PART MUTE buttons, which prevent the audio from going to the output. This is not what you describe you want to do. So you have simply chosen the wrong method to do this change. ON and OFF, MUTE and UNMUTE are very clearly understood words and the behavior is exactly as expected. If you were to turn OFF a light, it is immediate and definitive. So is turning OFF or MUTING a PART.

If you want to have the violin sound continue while you activate organ sound, you can do so by placing the Violin VOICE in PART 1 of a MULTI, place the Organ VOICE in PART 2 of the same MULTI. Now when use the PART SELECT button [1] you will be playing the violin... it will sound, you can either hold the last note or chord with your hands or a sustain pedal, press PART SELECT [2] which will select the organ. The Violin will continue to sound until you either release the keys or release the sustain pedal. This works because we are not turning OFF the violin, we are not MUTING the violin, we are simply changing MIDI Transmit Channels.

The Channels stay active, but only the currently selected Channel (lit button) will actively transmit data. The held data persists until you finally release the key or pedal.

Hope that helps not only accomplish the goal but explains why it works the way it does.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. S70/90XS
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Very interesting! I knew there was a way to achieve that :)
Thanks for your explanations, they surely make it more clear about how to properly use the synth.

Are those PART SELECT buttons controllable by a pedal? IIRC the PART ON/OFF can be triggered by them (I don't if I'm confusing them with the ARP buttons).
  1. more than a month ago
  2. S70/90XS
  3. # 2
Bad Mister
Yamaha
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Are those PART SELECT buttons controllable by a pedal?
No. You're not understanding what is happening. By pressing the
Part Select button [1] and [2] you are actually selecting a new MIDI Keyboard Transmit Channel. We are using Multi mode where each Part can be set to receive on its own MIDI Channel. In Voice mode, and in Performance mode you are addressing a single MIDI channel. In Multi each Part could be on its own separate MIDI channel, by pressing the button you are physically changing the Transmit Channel.

Such an action cannot possibly be performed with a MIDI Channel message like a Foot Switch. You must actually press the button (physically) to change the keyboard transmit Channel (or address the keyboard with a System Exclusive message).
  1. more than a month ago
  2. S70/90XS
  3. # 3
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