YamahaSynth.com Forums

This is the place to talk about all things related to Yamaha Synthesizers!
  1. Mike
  2. Sherlock Holmes
  3. MOXF Series Music Production Synthesizers
  4. Wednesday, 20 October 2021
Thought I asked this question a couple of days ago but I cannot find the post. Here it is again....

What are the parameters that control the features below and where can they be edited? I may be using wrong names, so appreciate correction

1. The attack - basically the difference between the piano and the organ where the harder you hit the key the louder it sounds. It is set up as "on" on certain voices and "off" on others. Can it be changed....for example, could you turn it on for an organ voice? can you manipulate the intensity of it also?

2. Other effects related to how hard you hit the keys. The most common one I can think of is the 'Growl" you get on a Saxophone on some voices if you hit the key hard. Appears you can turn on certain effects, if you hit the key harder. I have one on a flute sound I want to turn off but I cannot find it. I have to be very careful how I hit the keys or I get this sound effect I do not want.

Thank you,

Mike
Responses (2)
Bad Mister
Yamaha
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
What are the parameters that control the features below and where can they be edited? I may be using wrong names, so appreciate correction

1. The attack - basically the difference between the piano and the organ where the harder you hit the key the louder it sounds. It is set up as "on" on certain voices and "off" on others. Can it be changed....for example, could you turn it on for an organ voice? can you manipulate the intensity of it also?
Attack is not the word you are looking for specifically. “Attack” is parameter used to describe how a sound begins. When you hammer, strike, pluck, blow or bow a musical instrument, that initial energy applied to the instrument is called the Attack.

Attack is typically described in one of three Envelope Generators: Pitch applied to the Oscillator, Filter applied to harmonic content, and Amplitude applied to how loud.

Instruments like the piano have a fairly quick Amplitude Attack… the key is hammered, the output level rises fairly quickly. The harder you hammer the key, the louder the result — this is referred to as Velocity Sensitivity or Touch Response… because the faster/harder a key is engaged the LOUDER the result.

Instruments like organ have an extremely quick Amplitude Attack… the key is struck, the output level rises almost immediately. But the amount of energy you use to strike the key has NO INFLUENCE on the result at all. The Velocity/Touch has absolutely no influence on the organ. The organ is always at the same Volume whether you strike the key hard or soft… no Velocity response, not touch sensitive in its loudness response.

The organ was invented in 300 BC (and is not a velocity or touch sensitive instrument) by Pythagorus, it was however, the first keyboard.
Two thousand years later, circa 1700 AD the first velocity sensitive keyboard instrument was invented by Bartolomeo Cristofori (the “pianoforte” literally translates to soft-loud) it was the very first touch sensitive keyboard.

Organs, throughout the ages, have been adjusted in Volume by a pedal called the “Swell Pedal” — organists would no more play an organ without a swell pedal (Expression pedal in modern terms) than a pianist would play an acoustic piano without a Sustain pedal. It simply is not done. A Yamaha FC7 sweep pedal can be enlisted to play the role of the organ Swell Pedal when set to CC11 Expression.

Of course, in the age of synthesizer all rules are subject to being broken. If you want to make your organ sounds velocity sensitive you can do so…( first send apologies to Pythagorus, then work with the parameter that applies Level/Velocity)

You do so on a per ELEMENT EDIT basis. The Lvl/Vel parameter for Amplitude will be found among the AEG parameters.

On organ sounds you will see “Lvl/Vel” = +0 which means no increase in level when velocity is increased.
When “Lvl/Vel” = a positive value 1-32 you are turning down the Level of the instrument response, meaning you will need to play harder to get louder. At +32 the normal KeyOn Level is so low you must strike the Key hard to get loud. Called “Velocity Sensitive”. You set the positive (+) value that gives you the range of response soft-to-loud that you prefer.

If you increase “Level/Velocity” beyond +33, you now will hear no output at all when the key is struck very lightly. If you set the “Lvl/Vel” = +63, this is so extreme only keys struck with the strongest of velocities will register a result, at all

2. Other effects related to how hard you hit the keys. The most common one I can think of is the 'Growl" you get on a Saxophone on some voices if you hit the key hard. Appears you can turn on certain effects, if you hit the key harder. I have one on a flute sound I want to turn off but I cannot find it. I have to be very careful how I hit the keys or I get this sound effect I do not want.
Velocity can be used for many different things. Velo Growl (Velocity Growl) - one of the 8 Oscillators (Elements) that can be used to make a sound can be set to trigger at a specific Velocity range. If the Velocity Limits for the “Growl” Element is set to 126-127, you must hit the key very hard to get the growl.

Many different things can be Velocity Limited… including things like Arpeggios. You can have an instrument like a flute execute a trill (flutter tongue) Arpeggio phrase when you strike a key above a specific velocity value.

Tell us which Voice and we can tell you how it’s done and how to fix it to how you like.


Extra Credit: from a previous article on the subject…of customizing Velocity on an acoustic Piano sound….
Keyboard Velocity Curve” is an overall setting. However, each Voice can be tailored to your touch response on a per Voice basis, as well. And that is what we will take a look at now.

Filter and Amplitude Touch Response…
The three basic areas of control on both analog and sample based synthesis are Pitch, Filter, and Amplitude. There is very little significant movement in Pitch during the playing of a piano note – what little there is, is already recorded in the attack portion of the waveform. Therefore, we will be concentrating our discussion on the Filter and Amplitude portions.

The Filter is responsible for “tone” or harmonic content control. And Amplitude is “loudness”.

How these parameters respond to your touch are the parameters we will look at now. It is true in nature that the harder or more energy you put into playing a musical instrument, the louder in volume and brighter in tone it becomes. This is the domain of the Amplitude and Filter Velocity Sensitivity controls.

Press [EDIT]
Touch Track 1 to select Element 1 parameters
Press [F4] AMPLITUDE
Press [F2] VEL SENS (Velocity Sensitivity)

“Envelope Generator Time Velocity Sensitivity” parameter here influences how the Amplitude Envelope Generator changes to your touch.

An Envelope Generator is responsible for how something (in this case loudness) changes over time. The “EG Time Vel Sens” = +10 means that as you play a key with more velocity there is an increase in speed of the attack and decay portions of the envelope.

Press [F1] LEVEL/PAN

“Level Velocity Sensitivity” parameter here influence how the Amplitude change in loudness to your touch.
“Level Velocity Sens” = +25 with a Curve = 3 influences a change in loudness with an increase in velocity.

“Level Velocity Sensitivity” Values:
When dealing with Velocity Sensitivity here - a value of 0 will remove all velocity responsiveness from this Element. (Organ sounds, harpsichords, and original analog synthesizer sounds are examples of instruments that have no velocity sensitivity). A value of +32 is linear response - that is, for each unit input you get a unit output. As you increase above +32 toward +63 you are working with “crossfade” velocity response. When you set the Level Velocity Sensitivity to a maximum of +63, only a very strong strike will cause the Element to sound at all. Values from +33 through +63 are great when you want soft key-strikes to be ignored by a particular Element.

Velocity Curve:
The Curve of 3 makes it fairly easy to get this change in loudness response. Try a different setting for “Level Velocity Sens” and see how it affects the overall response of the Voice. Try a different Curve and see how it feels. Learn to use the EDIT/COMPARE function. That is, after you have made a change to a specific parameter you can press the EDIT button again (it will begin to flash) – this will place you in COMPARE mode. While in COMPARE the values you have edited but not yet STORED are returned to their previous value. You can play and hear the original values.

Press EDIT/COMPARE again to return to the values you have changed. (Please be aware that while in Compare mode you cannot make any further changes to values).
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Thank you so much...going to take a while to digest....out of town for a while so no keyboard handy.
  • Page :
  • 1


There are no replies made for this post yet.
Be one of the first to reply to this post!
2021 © Yamaha Corporation of America and Yamaha Corporation. All rights reserved.